Landscapes & labscapes : exploring the lab-field border in biology /

Kohler explores the people, places and practices of field biology in the United States from the 1890s to the 1950s. Using historical frontiers as models, he shows how biologists created vigorous new border sciences of ecology and evolutionary biology.

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Kohler, Robert E.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, ©2002.
Subjects:
Online Access:Available via EBSCO eBook Collection
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Table of Contents:
  • Cover13;
  • Contents13;
  • List of Illustrations
  • William F. Ganong
  • 2.1 Charles O. Whitman
  • 2.2 Charles C. Adams
  • 2.3 Collecting expedition, Woods Hole
  • 2.4 Carnegie Station for Experimental Evolution
  • 2.5 University of Pennsylvania vivarium
  • 2.6 Field station, Gull Lake
  • 2.7 Carnegie Institution Desert Laboratory
  • 3.1 Charles B. Davenport
  • 3.2 Carl H. Eigenmann at Donaldsons Cave
  • 3.3 Student fieldwork, Syracuse Lake
  • 3.4 Henry F. Nachtrieb and 8220;Megalops8221;
  • 3.5 8220;Driftwood Lake8221; (Sister Lake)
  • 3.6 Henry C. Cowles and Homer L. Shantz
  • 4.1 Counting a quadrat, Mount Garfield
  • 4.2 A chart quadrat
  • 4.3 Eggbeater psychrometer
  • 4.4 Edward A. Birge and Chancey Juday, Lake Mendota
  • 4.5 Atmometers
  • 4.6 Phytometer garden, Pikes Peak
  • 4.7 Edith and Frederic E. Clements
  • 4.8 Stations in the Santa Catalina Mountains
  • 5.1 Francis B. Sumner, Woods Hole
  • 5.2 Francis B. Sumner with 8220;Perodipus8221;
  • 5.3 Mexico, William Towers field sites
  • 5.4 Arthur Banta, Cold Spring Harbor
  • 5.5 Tahiti, topographic map
  • 5.6 Victor E. Shelford, University of Chicago
  • 5.7 Field stations, Sierra Nevada
  • 5.8 Harvey Halls field garden
  • 5.9 Taxonomy of a species group
  • 5.10 Jens Clausens field gardens
  • 6.1 Conway MacMillan
  • 6.2 William F. Ganong
  • 6.3 Henry C. Cowles and students
  • 6.4 Henry A. Gleason
  • 6.5 Edith and Frederic E. Clements, Pikes Peak
  • 6.6 Francis B. Sumner
  • 6.7 Forrest Shreve
  • 7.1 Glacier Bay, Alaska
  • 7.2 Salton Sea
  • 7.3 Lodgepole pine forest, Estes Park
  • 7.4 Concentric glacial bog
  • 7.5 Glacial physiography, Lake Michigan
  • 7.6 Indiana dunes
  • 7.7 Fossil beaches, Lake Michigan
  • 7.8 Lakeshore stream series
  • 7.9 San Francisco Mountains
  • 7.10 Humboldt Bay research site
  • 7.11 Santa Rosa Island
  • 8.1 Biogeography of subspecies ring
  • 8.2 Double invasion of an island
  • 8.3 Edgar Anderson
  • 8.4 Cajun farms, Mississippi Delta
  • 8.5 Distribution of hybrids
  • 8.6 Seasonal fauna, Cedar Creek Bog
  • 8.7 Cedar Creek Bog, Minnesota
  • 8.8 Transect, Cedar Creek Bog
  • 8.9 Vegetation map, Great Smoky Mountains
  • 9.1 Silver Springs, Florida
  • 9.2 Silver Springs sampling sites
  • 9.3 Sonoran desert expeditions
  • Preface
  • Chapter 1: Borders and History
  • Field and Lab in Biology
  • Lab and Field as Place
  • Borders and Frontiers
  • An Overview, with Caveats
  • Chapter 2: A New Natural History
  • The New Natural History
  • New Naturalists and Educational Reform
  • Labscapes: Marine Stations and Biological Farms
  • Labscapes: Vivaria and Field Stations
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 3: Border Crossings
  • The Rise and Decline of Biometry
  • Ecology: Physiology or Natural History?
  • Up 8220;Brush Creek8221; and Back Again
  • Guardians of the Faith: Genetics and Physiology
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 4: Taking Natures Measure
  • Trust in Numbers: Quadrats
  • Taking Natures Measure: Instruments
  • Plant-Machine: Atmometers and Phytometers
  • Instrumental Eye: The Camera
  • Making the Place Right: Forrest Shreve
  • Conclusion
  • Chapter 5: Experiments in Nature
  • Experimental Evolution
  • Shifting Ground: Field and Lab
  • Experiments in Natu.