Domestic abolitionism and juvenile literature, 1830-1865 /

"Deborah C. De Rosa examines the multifaceted nature of domestic abolitionism, a discourse that nineteenth-century women created to voice their political sentiments when cultural imperatives demanded their silence. For nineteenth-century women struggling to find an abolitionist voice while main...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: De Rosa, Deborah C.
Format: eBook
Language:English
Published: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©2003.
Series:UPCC book collections on Project MUSE.
Subjects:
Online Access:Available via EBSCO eBook Collection
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Summary:"Deborah C. De Rosa examines the multifaceted nature of domestic abolitionism, a discourse that nineteenth-century women created to voice their political sentiments when cultural imperatives demanded their silence. For nineteenth-century women struggling to find an abolitionist voice while maintaining the codes of gender and respectability, writing children's literature was an acceptable strategy to counteract the opposition. By seizing the opportunity to write abolitionist juvenile literature, De Rosa argues, domestic abolitionists were able to enter the public arena while simultaneously maintaining their identities as exemplary mother-educators and preserving their claims to "femininity." Using close textual analyses of archival materials, De Rosa examines the convergence of discourses about slavery, gender, and children in juvenile literature from 1830 to 1865, filling an important gap in our understanding of women's literary productions about race and gender, as well as our understanding of nineteenth-century American literature more generally."--Jacket.
Physical Description:1 online resource (xiii, 200 pages) : illustrations
Bibliography:Includes bibliographical references (pages 169-187) and index.
ISBN:1417538384
9781417538386
0791458261
9780791458266
0791458253
9780791458259
9780791486306
0791486303